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Suspects are being sought after police say 11 people were shot and wounded during a drive-by shooting in a central Florida neighborhood. Lakeland police say two of the victims were critically injured Monday afternoon, while the wounds of the other victims weren’t considered life-threatening. Police say a crowd had gathered along a residential street when a sedan rolled by. Authorities say four people fired from the windows before the car sped away. Investigators believe the shooting was a targeted attack. Authorities on Tuesday offered a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the suspects involved in the shooting.

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The family of Tyre Nichols plans to speak about the latest developments in the case, including the suspension of two officers and the firing of three emergency responders. The family will gather Tuesday evening with the Rev. Al Sharpton and attorney Ben Crump at the historic Mason Temple in Memphis. That's where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his final speech. Five Black officers have already been fired and charged with second-degree murder and other offenses. Six officers belonged to a now-disbanded unit that focused on high-crime areas. Crump says other Memphis residents who say they also were “brutalized” by officers in the unit will speak.

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U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken has wrapped up a two-day visit to Israel and the occupied West Bank with little to show for his renewed appeals for Israeli-Palestinian calm amid an alarming spike of violence. Blinken met with Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank town of Ramallah on Tuesday, a day after seeing Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Afterwards, he said the recent surge in violence was deeply concerning and that it's the responsibility of both sides to take steps to de-escalate the situation. He said he was leaving two senior aides behind to explore various ideas on how to lower the tensions but declined to say what those ideas are.

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Pope Francis is demanding that foreign powers stop plundering Africa’s natural resources. He plunged head first into his agenda upon arrival in Congo, where he was greeted with a raucous welcome by Congolese grateful he was focusing the world’s attention on their forgotten plight. Tens of thousands of Congolese lined the main road into the capital, Kinshasa, to welcome Francis on Tuesday after he landed at the airport, some standing three or four deep, with children in school uniforms taking the front row.  In a speech to government authorities, Francis said: “Hands off the Democratic Republic of the Congo! Hands off Africa!”

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Winter weather is bringing ice to Texas and nearby states, causing the cancellation of more than 1,300 flights nationwide. Numerous auto collisions were reported in Austin, Texas, with at least one fatality reported. Tracking service FlightAware says more than 700 flights to or from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and nearly 200 to or from Dallas Love Field were canceled or delayed Tuesday. The storm began Monday as part of an expected several rounds of wintry precipitation through Wednesday across Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tennessee. A winter weather advisory is in place into much of Kentucky, West Virginia and southern parts of Indiana and Ohio.

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The Justice Department has been scrutinizing a controversial artificial intelligence tool used by a Pittsburgh-area child protective services agency following concerns that it could result in discrimination against families with disabilities, The Associated Press has learned. The interest from federal civil rights attorneys comes after an AP investigation revealed potential bias and transparency issues about the opaque algorithm. The Allegheny Family Screening Tool is designed to assess a family’s risk level when they are reported for child welfare concerns. A Justice Department spokesman declined to comment. An Allegheny County Department of Human Services spokesman said the agency had not heard from the Justice Department.

Jason Jitoboh won’t step foot onto a basketball court without his glasses. And he doesn’t even need them to see. The darkened lenses merely provide extra protection for what eyesight Jitoboh has remaining. Florida’s 6-foot-11 center took a finger to his left eye at Tennessee last January and spent the better part of a year trying to get right. He’s had four surgeries already and might have a fifth following the season. He faces the second-ranked Volunteers for the first time since his injury when Florida hosts Tennessee on Wednesday.

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A judge has followed the recommendation of a Chicago prosecutor and dismissed sex-abuse charges against R&B singer R. Kelly. Tuesday's hearing lasted just minutes. It came a day after Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx said she was comfortable dropping the case because Kelly already will spend decades in prison for convictions in federal court. Kelly was awaiting trial in Illinois state court on charges of sexually abusing four people in the Chicago area, three of whom were minors. Federal juries in Chicago and New York have convicted him of a raft of crimes, including child pornography, enticement, racketeering and sex trafficking. Kelly is serving a 30-year prison sentence in the New York case.

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Republican Rep. George Santos of New York has told GOP colleagues he is temporarily stepping down from his two congressional committees. The move comes amid a host of ethics issues and a day after he met with House Speaker Kevin McCarthy. Santos has faced numerous calls for his resignation and is facing multiple investigations by prosecutors over his personal and campaign finances and lies about his resume and family background. Santos was assigned to the House Committee on Small Business and to the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee. Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma said the decision was well-received from the GOP conference. Asked whether he was considering resigning from Congress, Santos replied, “No, I am not.”

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Former U.S. Senator David Durenberger has died at age 88. Durenberger was a Minnesota Republican who espoused a progressive brand of politics. His longtime spokesperson says his health has declined in recent months and he died Tuesday morning at his St. Paul home. Durenberger won a U.S. Senate seat in 1978 and served three terms. He was a champion of health care reform. He was unanimously censured by the Senate in 1990 following an ethics investigation into payments he received for book royalties and federal reimbursements for stays in a Minneapolis condo. In 1995, he pleaded guilty to five misdemeanor charges related to the condo payments. He became a critic of the Republican Party as it tilted toward fiscal conservatives focused on slashing government programs.

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The U.S. Justice Department has requested documents from Tesla  related to its Autopilot and “Full Self-Driving” features. The electric vehicle maker cautioned in a regulatory filing Tuesday that if the government decides to pursue an enforcement action, it could possibly have a material adverse impact on its business. Despite their names, Tesla still says on its website that the cars can’t drive themselves. Teslas using “Full Self-Driving” can navigate roads in many cases, but experts say the system can make mistakes, which even CEO Elon Musk acknowledges. A message was left Tuesday seeking comment from the Justice Department.

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Donna Kelce is going to have to pull out her custom jersey — the one with Kansas City Chiefs tight end Travis Kelce’s front stitched to Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce’s back — one more time this season. For the first time in Super Bowl history, a pair of siblings will square off on the NFL’s biggest stage. Kelce helped the Chiefs return to their third championship game in four seasons on Sunday night when they beat the Bengals for the AFC title. Jason has the Eagles back for the second time in six years after their NFC title win over the 49ers.

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Stocks are ticking higher on Wall Street. The S&P 500 was 0.5% higher Tuesday ahead of what many investors hope will be one of the Federal Reserve’s last economy-shaking hikes to interest rates for a while. Markets got a boost after a report showed that growth for U.S. workers’ pay and benefits slowed during the end of 2022. While that’s frustrating for people trying to keep up with soaring prices at the register, markets see it as an encouraging sign of easing pressure on inflation. The Fed is set to announce its latest rate hike on Wednesday.

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Ukraine has won support from Baltic nations and Poland for its weekslong quest to obtain Western fighter jets. That ambition follows pledges by some larger nations last week to send Kyiv sophisticated modern tanks to help it beat back Russia’s invasion force after almost a year of fighting. Estonian Foreign Minister Urmas Reinsalu urged “all Western community countries” to speed up military help for Kyiv, including fighter jets. Poland, Slovakia and the Baltic countries on NATO’s eastern flank feel especially threatened by Russia. Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov held talks with his French counterpart, saying they did not discuss specific fighter jets but did talk about aviation “platforms” to help Ukraine’s ground-to-air defense.

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Nearly a quarter of millennials (22%) are living with their parents, and more than half of those living with them (55%) made the move in 2022, according to a December survey. Many said they’re back home due to high rent, money concerns or job losses — and 9 in 10 say they would move out if they made more money. Establishing yourself independently takes planning, discipline and patience on all fronts. It’s crucial to set clear goals, build up savings and bring in extra money, if needed. Here are six strategies to help you find your feet again.

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As Memphis police officers attacked Tyre Nichols with their feet, fists and a baton, others held Nichols down or milled about, even as he cried out in pain before his body went limp. Just like the attack on George Floyd, a simple intervention could have saved a life. Instead, Nichols is dead and five Memphis officers face murder charges. Memphis and Minneapolis police departments are among many with “duty to intervene” policies. It’s also the law. Three Minneapolis officers who didn’t try to stop the attack on Floyd were convicted of federal crimes. Experts agree peer pressure, and in some cases fear of retribution, is on the minds of officers who fail to stop colleagues from doing bad things.

Britain’s police chiefs have promised a “cultural change” as they apologized to families of the victims in the 1989 Hillsborough tragedy. The U.K.‘s worst sports disaster saw 97 people killed during a crush of soccer fans at an overcrowded stadium. Authorities spent years blaming fans for the disaster, and an initial inquest ruled the deaths an accident. But a second inquest concluded in 2016 that the victims were unlawfully killed as a result of failings by police and others. The National Police Chiefs Council and College of Policing said Tuesday that the code of ethics used by police forces will be reviewed.

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Cindy Williams, who played Shirley opposite Penny Marshall’s Laverne on the popular sitcom “Laverne & Shirley,” has died. Williams' family said in statement Monday that she died in Los Angeles Wednesday after a brief illness. She was 75. Williams credits included the films “American Graffiti" and “The Conversation.” But she was by far best known for playing the straitlaced Shirley Feeney on the ABC sitcom “Laverne & Shirley.” The show, a spinoff of “Happy Days” was one of the most popular shows on television in its prime. It ran from 1976 to 1983.

French labor leaders hope to bring more than 1 million demonstrators into the streets again in the latest clash of wills with the government over plans to push back France’s retirement age. For both sides, nationwide strikes and protests Tuesday are an important test. French President Emmanuel Macron’s government says it is determined to push through his election pledge to reform France’s retirement system. Labor unions and left-wing legislators are counting on protesters to turn out massively to strengthen their hand as they fight Macron’s plans. A first round of strikes and protests brought out between 1 million and 2 million demonstrators earlier this month. Labor unions are aiming to at least match or even better those numbers on Tuesday.

Police say 10 people were shot and wounded during a drive-by shooting in a central Florida neighborhood. Lakeland police say two of the victims were critically injured Monday afternoon, while the wounds of the other eight victims weren’t considered life-threatening. Police say a crowd of people were gathered along a residential street when a dark-blue sedan rolled by. Officials say four people fired from the windows before the car sped away. Officers were actively searching for the vehicle and the shooters Monday night. Investigators believe the shooting was a targeted attack.

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A Chicago prosecutor is dropping sex-abuse charges against singer R. Kelly. The decision follows federal convictions in two different courts that ensure the disgraced R&B star will be locked up for decades. Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx made the announcement Monday, a day ahead of a court hearing. Kelly was indicted in 2019 on multiple crimes and accused of sexually abusing four women in Illinois, including three who were minors. Since then, federal juries in Chicago and New York have convicted him of a raft of crimes, including child pornography, enticement, racketeering and sex trafficking. Kelly is already serving a 30-year prison sentence.

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The Philadelphia Eagles and Kansas City Chiefs prevailed on championship weekend to reach Super Bowl 57. But the NFL didn't exactly have a stellar weekend as infuriating flags and non-calls dominated both the NFC and AFC title games. The NFC championship was a blowout because the San Francsico 49ers lost all their quarterbacks. An emergency third quarterback would have come in handy Sunday but the league and its players ditched the third quarterback designation more than a decade ago. The AFC title game went down to the wire but questionable calls including an intentional grounding on Joe Burrow proved crucial.

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Experts are warning that Nigeria's push to replace its paper money with newly designed currency notes has created a shortage of cash. They say people can't buy what they need and businesses have closed in Africa's largest economy. Ayokunle Olubunmi of Nigeria’s main ratings agency, Agusto and Co., says the move to replace the new banknotes is “rushed” and commercial banks don’t have enough new cash to give to customers. Policymakers say the redesigned banknotes and new withdrawal limits would help curb the use of money to influence Nigeria’s Feb. 25 presidential election. Experts argue the currency changes are being done at the expense of most Nigerians.

President Joe Biden is traveling to New York City to showcase a $292 million mega grant that will be used to help build a rail tunnel beneath the Hudson River. The mega grant is part of a broader effort to draw a contrast between the Democratic president's economic vision and that of Republicans. The funding for the New York-New Jersey tunnel project is part of the $1.2 billion in mega grants that have been awarded under the 2021 infrastructure law. Biden is making a pitch that government spending on infrastructure will boost economic growth and create blue-collar jobs.

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Prosecutors are scheduled to file involuntary manslaughter charges in connection with the fatal shooting of a cinematographer by actor Alec Baldwin during a rehearsal on the set of a Western movie in 2021. Prosecutors say they will file in court and make public felony charges against Baldwin and weapons supervisor Hannah Gutierrez-Reed that could carry penalties of up to five years in prison. Prosecutors also said they will release a signed plea agreement with assistant director David Halls. Halls oversaw safety on the set. Baldwin has described the killing as a tragic accident and says he was told the gun was safe.

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin says the United States will increase its deployment of advanced weapons such as fighter jets and bombers to the Korean Peninsula as it strengthens joint training and operational planning with South Korea in response to a growing North Korean nuclear threat. Austin made the comments after he and South Korean Defense Minister Lee Jong-Sup agreed to further expand their combined military exercises and continue a “timely and coordinated” deployment of U.S. strategic assets to the region. Austin and Lee also discussed preparations for a simulated exercise between the allies in February aimed at sharpening their response if North Korea uses nuclear weapons.

Hall of Fame forward Bobby Hull, who helped the Chicago Blackhawks win the 1961 Stanley Cup Final, has died. Hull was 84. The two-time MVP was one of the most prolific scorers in NHL history, leading the league in goals seven times. Nicknamed “The Golden Jet” for his speed and blond hair, he posted 13 consecutive seasons with 30 goals or more from 1959-72. Hull and Stan Mikita powered Chicago to the NHL title in 1961. Hull remains the Blackhawks’ career leader with 62 playoff goals. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1983 and his No. 9 sweater was retired by Chicago that same year.

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Boeing bids farewell to an icon on Tuesday: It's delivering its final 747 jumbo jet. Since it debuted in 1969, the 747 has served as a cargo plane, a commercial aircraft capable of carrying nearly 500 passengers, and the Air Force One presidential aircraft. It revolutionized international travel. But over about the past 15 years, Boeing and its European rival Airbus have introduced more profitable and fuel efficient wide-body planes, with two engines instead of the 747's four. The final plane is the 1,574th built by Boeing in the Puget Sound region of Washington state. It's being delivered to cargo carrier Atlas Air.

The presidential campaign landscape in Iowa is markedly different this year compared with four years ago. In 2019, at least a dozen Democratic hopefuls eager to make their case against the Republican incumbent, Donald Trump, had either visited Iowa or had announced plans to visit soon. This year, Republicans considering a challenge to Democrat Joe Biden seem frozen by Trump’s early announcement of a 2024 campaign. With Iowa’s first-in-the-nation GOP caucuses just a year off, the field of would-be White House candidates has largely been content to steer clear of the state. Even Trump has been absent from Iowa, choosing instead to kickstart his campaign last weekend in New Hampshire and South Carolina.

SUNBURY — A former Sunbury man, who was convicted by a jury in March 2019 of seven felony offenses including rape of a child and sentenced Aug. 5, 2019, to 10 to 20 years in state prison before being granted a new trial, pleaded no contest Monday morning to a misdemeanor of recklessly endang…

COAL TOWNSHIP — Authorities released few details regarding a second-alarm dwelling fire at 951 W. Holly St. that occurred shortly after noon Monday as officers continue to investigate the cause of the blaze.

SUNBURY — A 28-year-old Mount Carmel man accused of murder in connection with the death of his ex-girlfriend in Coal Township in 2021 is scheduled to go to trial in March.

WASHINGTON — Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA) today announced $160,000 in federal funding for the GoShamokin! Revitalization Plan to develop a comprehensive safety action plan. The plan would identify action steps needed to upgrade the City of Shamokin with a focus on improving connectivity, ADA access…

SUNBURY — The following defendants were sentenced in Northumberland County Court of Common Pleas:

Gas prices across the Susquehanna Valley are nine cents higher this week at $3.799 per gallon, according to AAA East Central’s Gas Price Report.

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NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, in Japan as part of his Asia tour, said “our security is closely interconnected” and called for stronger ties with Japan as Russia’s war on Ukraine has made the world more dangerous and unpredictable and believers of democracy and freedom need stronger partnerships. Japan has been quick to join the U.S.-led economic sanctions against Russia’s war on Ukraine and provided humanitarian aid and non-combative defense equipment for the Ukrainians. While in South Korea on Monday, Stoltenberg called for Seoul to provide direct military support to Ukraine to help Kyiv fight off the prolonged Russian invasion.

Six Western states that rely on water from the Colorado River have agreed on a model to dramatically cut water use in the basin. California is the holdout. The state has the largest allocation of water from the river that serves 40 million people and a $5 billion-a-year agricultural industry. States missed a mid-August deadline to heed the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's call to conserve 2 million to 4 million acre-feet. They regrouped to reach consensus by the end of January. The outline will factor into a larger proposal on how to operate the two largest dams on the river. California didn't sign on to Monday's plan, but says it intends to release its own proposal.

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The outlook for the global economy is growing slightly brighter as China eases its zero-COVID policies and the world shows surprising resilience in the face of high inflation, elevated interest rates and Russia’s ongoing war against Ukraine. That’s the view of the International Monetary Fund, which now expects the world economy to grow 2.9% this year. That forecast is better than the 2.7% expansion for 2023 that the IMF predicted in October, though down from the estimated 3.4% growth in 2022. The IMF, a 190-country lending organization, foresees inflation easing this year, a result of aggressive interest rate hikes by the Federal Reserve and other major central banks.

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Memphis police say two more officers involved in the arrest, beating and death of Tyre Nichols have been disciplined. Five Memphis officers already had been fired and charged in the Jan. 7 arrest of Nichols, who was Black. Police said Monday that officer Preston Hemphill was relieved of duty shortly after Nichols’ Jan. 7 arrest. The department said later that another officer has been relieved of duty. In total, seven officers have been disciplined for the arrest of Nichols, who died Jan. 10. Also Monday, two Memphis Fire Department emergency medical workers and a lieutenant were fired in connection with the case.

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Multiple news reports say Manhattan prosecutors have convened a new grand jury to hear evidence in a probe of payments made to keep two women quiet about alleged affairs with former President Donald Trump. The reports cite unnamed sources familiar with the proceedings. A spokesperson for Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg declined to comment Monday. In a post to his Truth Social platform, Trump blasted Bragg as the “Radical Left Manhattan D.A.” and said the new grand jury was “a continuation of the Greatest Witch Hunt of all time.” Trump has denied having affairs with either woman.

Those killed when a gunman opened fire at a Los Angeles-area dance hall are being remembered by friends and family for the zest for life that brought them out that night to celebrate the Lunar New Year. Eleven people were killed when a gunman opened fire on Saturday night at the Star Ballroom Dance Studio, a dance hall in Monterey Park that is popular with older Asian Americans. Among those killed were 63-year-old LiLan Li, whose daughter remembers her as a loving grandmother and “a pillar of strength and optimism."

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President Joe Biden has informed Congress that he will end the twin national emergencies for addressing COVID-19 on May 11, as most of the world has returned closer to normalcy nearly three years after they were first declared. The move to end the national emergency and public health emergency declarations will formally restructure the federal coronavirus response to treat the virus as an endemic threat to public health that can be managed through agencies’ normal authorities. It comes as lawmakers have already ended elements of the emergencies that kept millions of Americans insured during the pandemic.

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“I did him so bad.” That’s what a South Carolina investigator testified that Alex Murdaugh had uttered between sobs during a recorded interview three days after Murdaugh’s wife and son were killed. But the audio from the police interview that was played at the disgraced attorney’s double murder trial wasn’t so clear. To some inside and outside the courtroom Monday it sounded like Murdaugh said, “They did him so bad.” Court ended before the defense could cross-examine State Law Enforcement Division Senior Special Agent Jeff Croft. Earlier in the day, defense attorneys continued to question the way authorities collected and analyzed evidence in the shooting deaths of Murdaugh’s wife and son.

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COVID-19 precautions wiped out most New Orleans’ Mardi Gras festivities in 2021, and a shortage of police officers forced the city to shorten routes for some of its lavish seasonal parades in 2022. Now, city officials and business owners are celebrating plans to let the good times roll on longer routes -- and in front of businesses that welcome the crowds. Mayor LaToya Cantrell, Interim Police Superintendent Michelle Woodfork and Sheriff Susan Hutson on Monday officially announced that parade routes are being lengthened thanks to agreements with other law enforcement agencies that will help New Orleans police beef up parade security.

A federal judge has denied a bid by LIV Golf to receive communications between the PGA Tour and 10 additional Augusta National members to part of its discovery process. LIV wanted PGA Tour board members and retired commissioner Tim Finchem to provide all communications with Augusta National members. The list was narrowed to four club employees and seven members. Among the additional members was former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. LIV alleges she attempted to persuade the Justice Department not to investigate the tour. The judge says the request for communications with more club members is overly burdensome and not in proportion to the needs of the litigation.