Scammers seize on US election, but it's not votes they want

Harvard University graduate student Maya James poses in a park near the university, Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020, in Cambridge, Mass. Law enforcement and voting advocates are warning that con artists are exploiting the election with scams targeting voters. James received an email from a political action committee that seemed harmless: if you support Joe Biden, it urged, click here to check you're registered to vote. Instead, she Googled the name of the group and it didn’t exist - a clue the email was a phishing scam.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The email from a political action committee seemed harmless: if you support Joe Biden, it urged, click here to make sure you're registered to vote.

But Harvard University graduate student Maya James did not click. Instead, she Googled the name of the soliciting PAC. It didn’t exist -- a clue the email was a phishing scam from swindlers trying to exploit the U.S. presidential election as a way to steal peoples' personal information.

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