Just over a year ago, the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings got underway. They dropped a bomb on American social psychology and created a tectonic divide. And, as a book published this week suggests, their controversies were the result of a politically motivated hit campaign.

I have to admit that when President Trump picked Brett Kavanaugh to fill Anthony Kennedy’s seat on the high court, I wasn’t doing cartwheels. My choice was Amy Coney Barrett, the Notre Dame Law professor and federal judge who in 2017 had been accused of letting Catholic dogma “live loudly” in her. The way she handled that incredibly offensive line of questioning from California Sen. Dianne Feinstein was a reflection of how she’d deal with people who think conservative female judges can’t separate their personal ideology from their constitutional obligations.

Flowers is an attorney and a columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer.

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